Fast Marketing fails 3

This article compliments ‘McMarketing in the tech sector – Does fast marketing just create indigestion?’

Fast marketing happens when marketers are institutionally influenced to choose quantity over quality, and convenience over content. When engagement assets, landing pages, outreach or conversations are simply quickfried with little culinary skill, the results can leave customers feeling hungry or, worse still, with a bad aftertaste.

Like fast food, fast marketing can suffer from bland, artificial ingredients.

Fast food and fast marketing may be predicated on convenience but both come with compromise.

One significant compromise is typically a lack of quality ingredients in content that lacks distinctive flavours. The compromise is compounded when fast marketing means offering a limited menu of formulaic food for thought – with little choice other than ‘supersizing’ – or in other words, quantity over quality.

The Tech sector can be particularly prone to the ‘McMessaging’ approach. With access to the content equivalent of a beef herd the size of Texas, it can be very tempting to simply throw it into the marketing mincer and churn out a patty of generic messages with a side order of undifferentiated propositions.

Fresh, carefully selected ingredients are key to whetting an audience appetite for tech marketing content. Rather than re-heat a stale white paper or de-frost content that can be found in any competitor’s digital deep freezer, it pays to source and prepare your own content ingredients for a menu that offers more distinctive flavouring and ultimately a more satisfying meal to an audience that has an appetite for quality over convenience.

Fast Marketing fails:
The all-you-can-eat buffet
The cold take-away
Bland ingredients

To make your marketing more enduring and sustainable, contact The Rubicon Agency for your personalised workshop

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